Become a member

The core of ecorisQ is made of its members. By joining ecorisQ you will expand your professional network and profit from transparent tools in the field of natural hazard risks. Being an ecorisQ member demonstrates that you are willing to increase the transparancy and reproducibility of natural hazard analyses and that you promote sustainable protection against natural hazards.  

Benefits of membership

Who can become a member?

Membership fee

How to apply?

Pic 1

January 2018 was an unusually warm and wet month across the Western Alps, with widespread landslides at low elevations and massive snowfall higher up. According to a comment published in Nature Geoscience, this extreme month yields lessons for how mountain communities can prepare for a warmer future. The weather of January 2018 was unusual - at the upper extreme of the historical distribution of storminess, temperature and precipitation measurements in the Western Alps – and broke many weather records. Not only was January 2018 unprecedentedly warm, but it was also extremely wet with unusual snowfall at higher elevations. As regional climate models predict substantial warming and, to a lesser extent, increased precipitation across the European Alps, we argue that the extreme weather conditions and associate mass wasting observed during January 2018 could yield valuable insights into typical winter conditions to be expected by the end of the 21st century.

Pic 2

New in SOSlope version 1.3.9 July 2018:

  • Added new tree specie: Betula pendula (Birch)
  • Added display of soil USCS parameters in drop-down menu
  • Fixed bugs in some tree specie implementation
  • Removed message log during run for increased speed performance

The audience of the Norwegian Broadcasting chose the stretch between Bergen and Voss of the E16 highway, which currently serves as the main highway connecting the West Coast to eastern Norway and the highly populated Oslo area, as Norway's worst road. This is not only due to the more than 40 traffic casualties and several hundred injured, but also to repeated closures after landslides and rockfall.

Considering the traffic volume of about 5,000 cars a day, the need for action along the road is given, since frequent rockfalls and landslides are a source of insecurity for travelers and for freight transport. The Norwegian Road Administration has identified a first set of hazard reduction measures for about 100 million NOK. A completely new road with long tunnels connecting Bergen and Voss would cost 33 billion NOK according to the Ministry of Transport and Communications.